The story of blue: technology enabling culture, culture inspiring technology

The story of blue: technology enabling culture, culture inspiring technology

blue-kristin

The story of blue: technology enabling culture, culture inspiring technology

By: Kristin A. Phelps

If you are reading this, there is a 40% chance that blue is one of your favorite colors.  Several surveys across nationalities and genders all report that blue is the favorite color of much of the world. This preference, inevitably, has influenced cultures of the ancient Near East all the way to modern-day Puerto Rico. There are numerous theories as to why this is so, but what does blue, or any color for that matter, have to do with technology?  How does technology impact culture and vice versa?

Some of you may remember a famous scene from the 2006 movie The Devil Wears Prada in which the significance of the color cerulean (a variation of blue) is (fictitiously) discussed.  As described in the movie, cerulean makes its appearance in a single designer’s collection and then is picked up by other designers and eventually trickles down to mass retailers, providing money and jobs in its wake.  Many of those jobs would have been undoubtedly technical in nature, providing the expertise to use machinery to create clothing.  Undoubtedly, color is an artifact of our culture and, in this instance, culture pushes technology into providing the means of meeting the cultural demands of our society. To this point, Pantone (a company setting standards for color reproduction) chose the shade of blue called “Serenity” as one of the colors of 2016 and technology went right to work in enabling its use for fashion and decoration.

Now let’s go back a few millennia. A great example of the relationship between color, culture and technology is lapis lazuli.  Lapis lazuli is an intense blue semi-precious stone which was much prized in antiquity.  For the ancient Mediterranean and the Near East, the main source for lapis lazuli appears to have been the Sar-i-Sang mine in modern day Afghanistan which was active as early as the Neolithic period.  Stone mined from the area made its way into the Near East, Egypt and the Mediterranean where it was used in jewelry making, seal stones, and inlay.  In fact, the eyebrows on the famous gold death mask of King Tutankhamen are made of lapis lazuli from this mine.  Because lapis lazuli had to be imported, it rapidly became a highly prized luxury item and was generally used only by the elite and for religious items.  This was problematic for artists in Egypt who wanted to use blue as a pigment for tomb paintings.  They found it prohibitively expensive to use ground lapis lazuli as a pigment (now known as ultramarine) and so created one of the first synthetic blue pigments, Egyptian blue, as an inexpensive alternative.  Egyptian blue, which was meant to replicate the color of lapis lazuli, became a popular choice for artists up until the beginning of the Middle Ages.  It was replaced in popularity by Azurite as a pigment, and then Azurite was replaced by the synthetic Prussian blue, which was in time replaced by French ultramarine (the first synthetic pigment which most closely approximated true lapis lazuli.).  Throughout time, lapis lazuli continued to be the preferred pigment and arguably the inspiration for creation and use of other blue pigments with the help of technology that democratized its use and allowed artistic expression.

Without technology, we might not know as much as we do about lapis lazuli.  Technology enabled ancient artists to ‘cook’ up the recipe to turn lapis lazuli into a pigment for painting.  Technology has also allowed for the opportunity to utilize Ionoluminescence and cathodoluminescence to analyze probable origins for the lapis lazuli which was used in pigments.   Both processes are non-destructive ways of analyzing the luminescence of a sample for deviations in the chemical composition.  Scientific imaging also allows us to distinguish lapis lazuli from other blue pigments, and in the case of Egyptian blue, it offers a new solution to an old problem.  When a red light is shined on potential sources for Egyptian blue pigment which has worn away and is no longer visible, this synthetic pigment emits an infrared light, not visible to the naked eye.  The modern applications of this pigment include potential use as a security ink for paper money or official documents, with culture-driven technological advances being diffused in other aspects of our lives.

The interplay between culture and technology is interesting but why does it matter?   Well, imagine the world without blue as a reproducible color—no Blue Period for Picasso, no blue jeans, no Coomassie Brilliant Blue to help in Western blot analysis, no blue in the Puerto Rican flag.  Blue as a color is a part of our cultural heritage and is in use all around us.  It is a color with national association for many, it carries significance for some religious groups and we use it to convey ideas to each other.  Imagine the technological gaps we would have if culture had not pushed us into innovating around blue: how would are clothes be processed? how would our walls be painted? how would our money be made? how would our chemistry labs distinguish substances from one another?

At the Puerto Rico Science, Technology and Research Trust, our mission is “to invest, facilitate and build capacity to continually advance Puerto Rico’s economy and its citizens’ well-being through innovation-driven enterprises, science and technology and its industrial base.”  Many other countries around the world consider culture and cultural heritage to be an essential part of well-being.  If we define cultural heritage as UNESCO does, it is the tangible and intangible artifacts of being human. Tangible artifacts include museums, monuments, works of art, libraries, etc.  Intangible artifacts are our traditions and rituals.  In other words, our cultural heritage, our culture, are all the things that make us human beings.  The Trust is working to provide for a betterment and a staying power for all the parts which make Puerto Rico a special and unique place—the tangibles which, via the interplay of culture and technology, can advance the Puerto Rican economy and the intangibles which make it home.

Author:  Kristin A. Phelps is the Director of Cultural Heritage Technology and Innovation at the Puerto Rico Science, Technology and Research Trust.  She is a former archaeologist and experienced photographer and digitizer with training in conservation. Kristin has worked at the British Library, the British Museum and Petrie Museum, pursuing her research interests in Cultural Heritage Imaging. She is passionate about using visual digital content to open up museum and library collections to the public.

References:

Finerman, W. (Producer), & Frankel, D.(Director). (2006). The Devil Wears Prada [Motion Picture]. USA: 20th Century Fox.

Herrmann, G. (1968, Spring). Lapis Lazuli: The Early Phases of Its Trade. Iraq, 30(1), 21-57.

Ajango, Kelsey Michal.  (2010) New thoughts on the trade of lapis lazuli in the ancient near east: c. 3000 – 2000 B.C. (Bachelor of Arts thesis).  Retrieved from http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/64508

Favaro, M., Guastoni, A., Marini, F. & Gambirasi, A. (December 2011). Characterization of lapis lazuli and corresponding purified pigments for a provenance study of ultramarine pigments used in works of art.  Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 402(6), 2195-208.

Philip McCouat. (2014). Egyptian blue: the colour of technology. Journal of Art in Society.  Retrieved from www.artinsociety.com

“Background Note:  Cultural Heritage and Sustainable Development: A Rationale for Engagement” (From the sessions 3A-3A-a on Introducing Cultural Heritage into the Sustainable Development Agenda at the Hangzhou Congress:  Culture:  Key to Sustainable Development (May 15-17, 2013).)  http://www.unesco.org/new/fileadmin/MULTIMEDIA/HQ/CLT/images/HeritageENG.pdf (Accessed 25 October 2016)


El cuento azul: una cultura fomentando la tecnología, una cultura inspirando la tecnología

Por: Kristin A. Phelps

Si te encuentras leyendo esto, hay un 40% de probabilidad que el azul sea tu color favorito. Muchas encuestas realizadas a personas de diferentes nacionalidades y género, indican que el azul es el color favorito en el mundo. Esta preferencia, inevitablemente, ha influenciado desde la antigua cultura occidental hasta la vanguardia moderna de Puerto Rico. Hay innumerables teorías afirmando las distintas vertientes del por qué, pero, ¿Qué tiene que ver el color azul o cualquier color en específico con la tecnología? ¿Cómo la tecnología impacta la cultura actual y viceversa?

Algunos pueden recordar la escena icónica de la película The Devil Wears Prada (2006) en donde el significado del color cerulean (una variación del azul) es discutido dentro de la industria del diseño de ropa. El color aparece en la colección de un diseñador el cual luego es adaptado por otros diseñadores y eventualmente llega a las tiendas por departamento, fomentando dinero y empleos con su auge. Muchos de esos trabajos, sin duda alguna, serían técnicos de naturaleza, proveyendo el uso de expertos en maquinarias para la fabricación de la ropa. Los colores son un artefacto de nuestra cultura y en estos instantes, la cultura empuja la tecnología a proveer la demanda de la sociedad. Recientemente Pantone (una compañía  que aplica los estándares  de la reproducción de los colores) eligió el tono de azul llamado Serenidad como unos de los colores del 2016 y la tecnología fue trabajando facilitando su uso para la decoración y la moda.

Ahora volvamos algunos milenios atrás. Un buen ejemplo de la relación entre el color, la cultura y la tecnología es el lapislázuli. Lapislázuli es una piedra semi preciosa de apariencia azul intenso, muy valorado en objetos de antigüedades. Para los habitantes del antiguo Mediterráneo y regiones adyacentes, la fuente principal para el lapislázuli aparenta ser la mina de Sar-i-Sang, encontrado en lo que hoy día se conoce como Afganistán, el cual era activo desde el período Neolítico. Las piedras halladas en la mina se fueron esparciendo por Egipto, donde fue usado para diversos tipos de artesanías tales como la joyería, decoración y capas en otras piedras. De hecho, las cejas de la famosa máscara de oro del rey Tutankhamen son hechos de lapislázuli de dicha mina. Como el lapislázuli tiene que ser importado, se convirtió rápidamente en unos de los productos más valiosos y lujosos, con propósito de ser usados por la elite y figuras religiosas. Esto resulto problemático para los artistas que querían usar la piedra como ingrediente para la pigmentación de la pintura en los sepulcros. Al encontrar el pigmento tan caro, también conocido como ultramarino, crearon las primeras pigmentaciones sintéticas del azul. Llamadas azul Egipcio, como una alternativa económica, su intención fue replicar el color del lápiz luzula el cual luego se convierte en la preferencia de los artistas hasta el principio de la Edad Media. Luego fue remplazado por el Azurita como pigmento por la ultramarina francesa (el primero pigmento sintético más cercano a la verdadera tonalidad del lapislázuli). A través del tiempo el lapislázuli continúo siendo el pigmento preferido y podría decirse la inspiración por la creación y uso de las otras tonalidades del azul con la ayuda de la tecnología que ha democratizado su uso y expresión artística.

Sin tecnología no supiéramos lo mucho que sabemos del lapislázuli. La tecnología permitió a que los antiguos artistas confeccionaran la receta de convertir el lapislázuli a un pigmento para la pintura. El uso de la tecnología ha permitido la oportunidad de usar lonoluminosidad y catodoluminesidad para analizar los orígenes del lapislázuli el cual fue usado en pigmentos. Ambos procedimientos son seguros para analizar la luminosidad de una muestra para las desviaciones en la composición química. Composiciones científicas permiten diferenciar el lapislázuli de otras pigmentaciones azules, y en el caso del azul egipcio, este ofrece una nueva solución a un antiguo problema. Cuando una luz roja se le expone a las posibles fuentes para la pigmentación del azul Egipcio, el cual se ha desvanecido y ya no es visible, el pigmento sintético emite un luz infrarroja que no es visible a la vista natural. Las aplicaciones modernas de este pigmento incluyen el uso potencial de una marca de seguridad a través de la tinta en el dinero o documentos oficiales, con avances tecnológicos estimulados por la cultura para el uso de otros aspectos de nuestras vidas.

La relación entre la cultura y tecnología es interesante, pero ¿Qué tiene de relevancia? Imagínese un mundo sin azul como un color reproducible; no hay período azul para Picasso, no hay mahonés, no hay “Coomassie Brilliant Blue” para ayudar el análisis de mancha del oeste, no azul en la bandera de Puerto Rico. El azul forma parte de nuestra herencia cultural y su uso nos rodea constantemente. Es un color para distintas asociaciones nacionales, carga simbólica en la religión y lo usamos para compartir emociones e ideas. Imagine las lagunas de la tecnología si nuestra cultura no hubiera inspirado a innovar alrededor del color. ¿Cómo nuestra ropa fuera procesada? ¿Cómo nuestras paredes fueran pintadas? ¿Cómo nuestro dinero fuera fabricado? ¿Cómo nuestros laboratorios químicos diferenciarían una substancia de la otra?

En el Fideicomiso para Ciencias, Tecnología e Investigación, nuestra misión es invertir, facilitar y crear capacidad para avanzar continuamente la economía de Puerto Rico y el bienestar de sus ciudadanos a través de empresas basadas en la innovación, ciencia y tecnología y su base industrial. Muchos países alrededor del mundo consideran la cultura y la herencia cultural indispensable para el bien estar. Si definimos la herencia cultural como UNESCO la define, son los artefactos tangible e intangible del ser humano. Los artefactos tangibles incluyen los museos, monumentos trabajos de arte, librerías etc. Artefactos intangibles son nuestras tradiciones y rituales. En otras palabras, nuestra herencia cultural, nuestra cultura nos hace seres humanos. El Fideicomiso está trabajando para proveer mejorías y sustentabilidad para todas las partes que hace Puerto Rico un lugar especial y auténtico. Las tangibles, quien, vía la interrelación de la cultura y tecnología, puede desarrollar y fomentar la economía en Puerto Rico y las intangibles hacen nuestro hogar.

Autora:  Kristin A. Phelps es la Directora de Patrimonio Cultural, Tecnología e Innovación del Fideicomiso para Ciencia, Tecnología, e Investigación de Puerto Rico. Ella fue arqueóloga y fotógrafa con experiencia y digitalizadora con formación en conservación. Kristin ha trabajado en la Biblioteca Británica, el Museo Británico y el Museo Petrie, persiguiendo sus intereses de investigación en la Imagen de Patrimonio Cultural. Ella es apasionada sobre el uso de contenido digital visual para exponer colecciones de museos y bibliotecas al público.

Referencias:

Finerman, W. (Producer), & Frankel, D.(Director). (2006). The Devil Wears Prada [Motion Picture]. USA: 20th Century Fox.

Herrmann, G. (1968, Spring). Lapis Lazuli: The Early Phases of Its Trade. Iraq, 30(1), 21-57.

Ajango, Kelsey Michal.  (2010) New thoughts on the trade of lapis lazuli in the ancient near east: c. 3000 – 2000 B.C. (Bachelor of Arts thesis).  Retrieved from http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/64508

Favaro, M., Guastoni, A., Marini, F. & Gambirasi, A. (December 2011). Characterization of lapis lazuli and corresponding purified pigments for a provenance study of ultramarine pigments used in works of art.  Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 402(6), 2195-208.

Philip McCouat. (2014). Egyptian blue: the colour of technology. Journal of Art in Society.  Retrieved from www.artinsociety.com

“Background Note:  Cultural Heritage and Sustainable Development: A Rationale for Engagement” (From the sessions 3A-3A-a on Introducing Cultural Heritage into the Sustainable Development Agenda at the Hangzhou Congress:  Culture:  Key to Sustainable Development (May 15-17, 2013).)  http://www.unesco.org/new/fileadmin/MULTIMEDIA/HQ/CLT/images/HeritageENG.pdf (Accessed 25 October 2016)